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Pedestrian accidents along highways

On Behalf of | Jul 25, 2022 | Pedestrian Accidents |

Pedestrians face risks, whether it is when they are walking in a supermarket parking lot or crossing a busy intersection. Dangers also exist on busy Minnesota interstate highways. Therefore, anyone walking by an interstate should exercise extreme caution since vehicles may travel too close for comfort and at high speeds. Unfortunately, an accident may occur even when a pedestrian exercises great care.

Dangers near interstate highways

Some may assume that pedestrians take a chance of getting hurt when walking close to highway traffic. While there may be some truth to the statement, not every pedestrian walking so close to fast-moving traffic wants to be there. Someone’s car might break down, and they have no choice but to walk to a nearby convenience store for assistance. Even someone standing close to a parked car could get struck by a vehicle despite doing their best to avoid passing cars and trucks.

A pedestrian could also be a worker tasked with repairing street lights or imperfections on the shoulder of the road or a blocked-off right lane. Although the worker could place orange cones in clear view, not all drivers see them.

Getting hit by a passing vehicle

The aftermath of pedestrian accidents often involves investigations into what occurred. While a pedestrian could be partially at fault for the mishap, there are instances where the driver’s negligence was impossible to overlook. A driver who tries to pass cars by illegally driving on the shoulder puts anyone in that area at risk.

Intoxicated drivers may weave out of lanes, and veering too far to the right might take them onto the shoulder. Any injuries resulting from a driver’s negligence may result in a lawsuit, even when pedestrians walk along a dangerous highway.

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