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Some people in Minnesota will find any reason to have a drink. It might be at a party, after a long day at work or to complement a meal. Unfortunately, sometimes a person who has consumed too much alcohol tries to get behind the wheel of a car. It is important to understand how alcohol affects a person’s driving abilities.

Even if a person’s blood alcohol concentration is below the legal limit, their ability to drive could still be compromised. If a person’s BAC is 0.02 percent, they may experience a decline in their ability to track moving objects, such as other drivers, and they may not be able to divide their attention between two or more tasks. If a person’s BAC is 0.05 percent, their coordination and ability to track moving targets may be reduced, they may find it more difficult to steer their vehicle and they may not be able to quickly respond to emergency situations.

Once a person’s BAC reaches the legal limit, their ability to drive is significantly impaired. If a person’s BAC is 0.08 percent, they may be unable to concentrate, they may experience short-term memory loss, they may not be able to control how fast they are driving, their perception may be compromised, and they may see a reduction in their ability to process information.

A BAC above the legal limit will severely compromise a person’s ability to drive safely. If a person’s BAC is 0.10 percent, in addition to the above effects, they may be unable to stay in their lane of traffic or stop their vehicle when necessary. If a person’s BAC is 0.15 percent, their ability to control their vehicle and pay attention to the road is substantially impaired, and their ability to process visual and auditory information is also substantially compromised.

In the end, even one drink could affect a person’s driving abilities. When a drunk driver causes a motor vehicle accident, this is a breach of their duty to drive reasonably. If another individual is injured in the crash, they may wish to pursue legal action against the drunk driver. A personal injury suit may go a long way, not just to provide the victim with the financial resources necessary to move on from the accident, but also to hold the drunk driver accountable for their actions.